The Notable Films Of 2019: C-F

The Notable Films Of 2019 C F

Onto the second volume of DH’s yearly film preview guide which includes the final adventures of the mutant ‘First Class’ before Disney reboot them, along with multiple remakes and reboots ranging from 1940s cartoons to 1970s TV shows to an early 80s stage musical, a late 80s horror classic and more recent foreign language film fare.

There’s also Tom Hardy going gonzo in a film called “Fonzo,” an arthouse auteur tackling the undead comedy genre, Marvel finally realising it has been holding a sausage party for a bit too long, the welcome return of several notable directors, and a couple of noted TV-to-film adaptations.

This second of six volumes runs from titles beginning with the letters C, D, E & F. Here’s the list:

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“Call of the Wild”
A new $82 million adaptation of the famed Jack London novel, this adventure tale blends CG animation and live-action to tell its story about a St. Bernard/Scotch Collie cross dog named Buck and John Thornton (Harrison Ford), a prospector searching for gold in the unforgiving Yukon at the end of the 19th century. The film was shot in California, both on location and on sound stages with the dogsled racing sequences to be done digitally via Technoprops. Chris Sanders (“The Croods”) is directing from a script by Michael Green (“Logan”), while Dan Stevens, Karen Gillan, Omar Sy and Bradley Whitford co-star.

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“Captain Marvel”
Marvel’s first film for the year FINALLY gives us a solo female superhero feature from the company, and while Brie Larson is a strong actress her character remains the biggest question mark of this 1990s-set tale as what little we’ve seen of her in the trailers haven’t exactly revealed much in way of traits beyond cockiness. Still, the character is a fan-favorite, and said to be the MCU’s most powerful, so between this and ‘Endgame’ a few weeks later we’ll have plenty of time to become more familiar. More importantly the film boasts the strong directing team of “Half Nelson” duo Anna Fleck & Ryan Boden, Ben Mendelsohn playing a Skrull villain with an Aussie accent, Samuel L. Jackson and Clark Gregg having some de-aged fun, Annette Bening joining the MCU as an alien geneticist, plenty of 1990s references, and hopefully the ability to surprise us.

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“Captive State”
Filmmaker Rupert Wyatt is as famous for starting and then leaving projects as much as the ones he’s actually made. He’s finished this one though, a $25 million dark sci-fi tale set nearly a decade after a global occupation by an extraterrestrial force has enslaved the world under the guise of peaceful unity. The narrative shows the lives of people within a Chicago neighborhood on both sides of the conflict with John Goodman as a cop who recruits a fallen soldier’s son (Ashton Sanders) to help spread the truth. Vera Farmiga, James Ransone, Kevin J. O’Connor, Kiki Layne and Jonathan Majors also star in the film.

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“Cats”
The most WTF film of the year, Tom Hopper follows up his solid screen adaptation of “Les Miserables” a few years back with this take on Andrew Lloyd Webber’s long-running but less well-respected “Cats”. The famed musical is set over a single night when a tribe of cats make what is known as “the Jellicle choice” and decide which cat will ascend to the Heaviside Layer and a new life. No-one is quite sure what the film’s final product will look like be it live-action, motion capture animated or something else. Whatever the case there’s a hell of an impressive cast including Jennifer Hudson, Judi Dench, Ian McKellen, Idris Elba, James Corden, and unexpectedly both Taylor Swift and Jason Derulo.

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“Chaos Walking”
Young adult fiction adaptations have often struggled since “Twilight,” and this take on Patrick Ness’ work comes armed with a high concept that’s hard to explain. The dystopian novel is set on a dangerous planet in the far future in which all women have been killed by a germ and all remaining living male creatures can hear one another’s thoughts in a stream of images, words and sounds called Noise. Tom Holland stars as a boy forced to flee his town with his loyal dog who comes upon a strange sight: a girl (Daisy Ridley). The complexity and difficult to convey premise is well suited for Charlie Kaufman who adapted the initial draft of the script (though it has since been polished a few times), and director Doug Liman (“Edge of Tomorrow”) which holds promise, but extensive reshoots and some major delays are more concerning. Hopefully, it all comes together.

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“Charlie’s Angels”
Hard to believe its been nearly twenty years since McG’s film reboot of the “Charlie’s Angels” franchise hit screens. Quickly scuttled TV remake aside, Sony has been trying to reboot the franchise for sometime and so now is updating the concept for a new generation that goes so beyond woke it’s – I’m not sure there’s a word for it yet. Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska are the new Angels, though they’re not P.I.s working for a mysterious man this time, rather they’re employees of a multinational security firm which has multiple teams and multiple Boseleys who serve as the handlers of each team with Patrick Stewart, Djimon Hounsou and the film’s director Elizabeth Banks all playing one. Tha handsome line-up of Jonathan Tucker, Sam Claflin and Noah Centineo also star in the film which is aiming for an early November release.

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“Child’s Play”
A remake of the famed Don Mancini 1988 slasher film about a mother who gives her son Andy a toy doll for his birthday, unaware of its sinister nature. In the original it was possessed by the soul of a serial killer, but the new take reimagines it as a robotic Chucky (with wi-fi) that gets hacked into and programmed to kill by a disgruntled toy company employee. Aubrey Plaza and Brian Tyree Henry lead the cast of the new take which made headlines when Mancini expressed that he is VERY unhappy with it and is instead creating his own fan film called “Charles” which Luis Serrano directs and is aiming for a release in May – a month before this opens.

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“City of Lies”
Brad Furman’s film adaptation of Randall Sullivan’s non-fiction book of the same name, this drama looks at the police case and later the private investigations of the unsolved murders of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls by the detective in charge Russell Poole (Johnny Depp). Forest Whitaker plays a reporter who came onboard nearly two decades later to help. Originally slated for the early Fall, the film was pulled from the schedule with no new date announced – though a screening in Italy at a festival last month drew good reviews. However legal issues involving the film may keep it locked away for a while.

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“Cold Pursuit”
Norwegian film director Hans Petter Moland remakes his own Golden Bear-nominated 2014 darkly comic action thriller “In Order of Disappearance” which followed a snowplough driver who learns his son died of an overdose and the local drug gang is behind the death. He hunts down the killers, goes after their bosses and in the process starts a major gang war. This English-language version switches out the darkly comic for a serious tone, and Stellan Skarsgard for Liam Neeson. It also adds Laura Dern, Emmy Rossum and Tom Batemen in supporting roles.

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“The Cradle”
Filmmaker Hope Dickson Leach delivered one of the more underseen films of recent years with her debut work “The Levelling,” and now she returns with another straight drama that enlists the great Jack O’Connell and actress Lily Collins for this adaptation of Patrick Somerville’s 2009 novel. The story follows an expecting newlywed couple and the husband’s attempts to find the abandoned antique cradle that his wife used when she was a baby. His search leads him to a discovery that will forever change his wife’s life and a difficult decision for him.

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“The Curse of La Llorona”
James Wan produces this upcoming supernatural horror film from Michael Chaves who did a good enough job that he’s taking over from Wan on the next “Conjuring” film. Linda Cardellini, Raymond Cruz and Patricia Velasquez star in the 1970s L.A. set story about a social worker and widowed mother who finds signs of foul play in one of her cases – signs similar to a terrifying supernatural entity known as the ‘Weeping Woman’ which will stop at nothing to take her children.

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“Danger Close”
This Australian war drama deals with the famed Battle of Long Tan during the Vietnam war in which the Viet Cong took on a small number of inexperienced Aussie & New Zealand forces in a rubber plantation. Despite 25-to-1 odds, the ANZACs held off the forces for three days until reinforcements arrived and the fight was seen as one of the more notable victories and savage battles in the war, even if recently there’s been much debate about the accuracy of accounts by survivors. Kriv Stenders (“Red Dog,” “Blacktown”) helms this take on the battle with the likes of Travis Fimmel, Luke Bracey, Richard Roxburgh, Nicholas Hamilton, Daniel Webber, Aaron Glenane, and Lincoln Lewis starring.

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“Dark Phoenix”
The fourth and seemingly last of the “X-Men: First Class”-era films before Disney takes over Fox and reboots the property so as to be incorporated into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Simon Kinberg, who has produced and written on the franchise for many years, helms the new film which aims to tell the famed ‘Dark Phoenix’ saga from the comics properly – as opposed to the much-maligned version seen in “X-Men: The Last Stand”. Whether he succeeded or not is unclear as the film has been delayed a few times and undergone reshoots with a lengthy post-production period. Kinberg adds that he wanted to take the time to get the visual effects right and a first trailer released a few months back visually looked good even if the overall reaction was underwhelming.

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“The Dead Don’t Die”
The last time filmmaker Jim Jarmusch tackled the supernatural we got the beloved vampire tale “Only Lovers Left Alive”. Now, in his follow-up to 2016’s “Paterson,” he’s trying out a zombie comedy with a new film in that field that will hopefully be unlike anything else of the kind and potentially refresh the overtired genre. Jarmusch regulars like Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton, Tom Waits and Steve Buscemi are all here, as are Caleb Landry Jones and Selena Gomez. Daniel Craig was linked but it’s uncertain if he’s still going to appear. With Focus to release the film, expect a potential Cannes bow.

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“The Death & Life of John F. Donovan”
Quebecios wunderkind Xavier Dolan’s first English language effort deals with the fallout from when a gossip magazine publishes the pen pal correspondence between an eleven-year-old British boy and a CW-esque twenty-something American male TV star. Misinterpretation of the innocent relationship leads to the actor’s life spiralling into suicide. Ten years on, the boy turned man reflects on the impact it had on his life. Taking a long time to complete, the film finally unfurled at Toronto and received universally negative reviews with the project dubbed easily his worst to date. Even so, it’ll be worth a look.

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“The Devil All The Time”
“The Sinner” creator and “Simon Killer” director Antonio Campos helms this adaptation of Donald Ray Pollock’s novel about a group of bizarre characters and how their lives unfold from the end of World War II to the 1960s in rural southern Ohio and West Virginia. Amongst them are Robert Pattinson as a spider-handling preacher, Tom Holland as a young man with violent tendencies, Chris Evans as a corrupt sheriff, a husband-and-wife team of serial killers, and the young man’s war veteran father offering blood sacrifices to cure his sick wife. Mia Wasikowska and Mia Goth also star in this very Flannery O’Conner-esque sounding bit of Southern (or rather mid-west) Gothic fiction and could prove a critical hit, but it won’t appear until year’s end at the earliest.

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“Dhaka”
Chris Hemsworth and hia “Avengers” helmers Joe and Anthony Russo come to Netflix with all three producing and the Aussie hunk starring in this gritty US-Indian action thriller. David Harbour, Derek Luke and numerous Indian actors star in the story of mercenary Tyler Rake (Hemsworth) who is hired to rescue the kidnapped son of an Indian businessman. Shot partly in India and mostly in Thailand, stuntman Sam Hargrave makes his feature directing debut on the film which Joe Russo also wrote. I’d expect something along “Man of Fire” lines but with more of a military-esque angle.

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“The Diary”
Jackie Chan steps behind the camera for this romantic drama starring “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” breakout star Noah Centineo, Andy Lau and Kevin Kline in the story of a young man (Jaycee Chan) in 1930s Shanghai who returns to Europe to reunite with the love of his life (Martina Stoessel). The project marks Chan’s first film as director in which he does not also star.

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“The Dirt”
Jeff Tremaine (“Jackass”) helms this very long in the works biopic about notorious 1980s rock ‘n roll group Motley Crue who produced such hits as “Kickstart My Heart,” “Dr. Feelgood” and “Girls, Girls, Girls”. Originally at Paramount, then Focus and finally at Netflix – the film got made and boasts some intriguing casting including Douglas Booth as Nikki Sixx, Iwan Rheon as Mick Mars, Daniel Webber as Vince Neil and rapper Machine Gun Kelly as Tommy Lee. Ozzy Osbourne and Heather Locklear are characters in this adaptation of the Neil Strauss book and no-one is quite sure what to expect.

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“Dolemite is My Name”
“Hustle and Flow” director Craig Brewer manages to get Eddie Murphy back on the screen with this new Netflix dramedy biopic about Rudy Ray Moore, a comedian best known for his raunchy comedy routines which were often done in rhyme. His acts included the creation of the character of Dolemite who went on to lead a blaxploitation film franchise in the 1970s. Wesley Snipes, Mike Epps, Craig Robinson, Tituss Burgess, Keegan-Michael Key, Tip T.I. Harris and Chris Rock co-star in the film which hails from “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” “1408” and “Ed Wood” scribes Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski.

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“Domino”
Thriller master Brian dePalma is switching out his sleazy Hitchcock template for Nordic noir with this crime thriller from Danish scriptwriter Petter Skavlan which is also DePalma’s first directorial effort in seven years. “Game of Thrones” alums Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Carice van Houten play Copenhagen police officers seeking justice for a murder by a mysterious man. The victim was his partner and her lover, and the pair is unwittingly caught in a cat-and-mouse chase with a duplicitous CIA agent who is using them as a pawn to trap ISIS members. The director famously says he had a terrible time on set so hopefully the final product isn’t too affected by that.

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“Doom”
2005’s Dwayne Johnson and Karl Urban-led adaptation of the iconic FPS video game was not a well received take, but it’s positively big budget compared to this straight to VOD reboot of the franchise led by Amy Manson (“Once Upon a Time”) and helmed by Tony Giglio (“S.W.A.T.: Under Siege”). Shot in Bulgaria on the cheap, it means they won’t be holding back the gore which should allow for some real brutality that otherwise wouldn’t be in a major release. Even so, don’t get your hopes up.

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“Dora the Explorer”
When a film adaptation of the popular kids animated Nickelodeon’s series was announced, somehow Michael Bay’s name was linked as a potential producer which led to an online field day of jokes. Bay has since shot down talk of any involvement in the project, which is otherwise a fairly straightforward looking adaptation of the property being done by “The Muppets” duo of director James Bobin and writer Nicholas Stoller. In the new take, Isabela Moner stars as an older teenage Dora who spent most of her life exploring the jungle with her parents and now faces the most dangerous adventure ever – High School. She soon finds herself leading Boots (her best friend, a monkey), Diego, and a ragtag group of teens on an adventure to save her parents and solve the impossible mystery behind a lost Inca civilization.

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“Downhill”
Fox Searchlight’s remake of Ruben Ostlund’s acclaimed Swedish drama-comedy feature “Force Majeure,” this one offers the unexpected pairing of Will Ferrell and Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the dark comedy of how a narrow avalanche escape during a ski vacation throws a seemingly picture-perfect family into disarray as they are forced to reevaluate life, and how they truly feel about each other. It’s a ‘wait and see’ as to whether the biting humor of the original will be softened by this Hollywood take, but the hiring of Nat Faxon and Jim Rash (“The Descendants”) to direct and “Succession” creator Jesse Armstrong to pen the script suggests its hard edges might remain intact.

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“Downton Abbey”
The famed ITV period drama series, that ran for six seasons before calling it a day, returns with a follow-up film adaptation continuing the story of the Crawley family. Pretty much all the cast from the original return, as does much of the crew with creator Julian Fellowes penning the script and the show’s pilot helmer Michael Engler directing the film. The action is likely to be set in the late 1920s this time out, but plot details are under wraps.

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“Dreamland”
Margot Robbie does her best Bonnie Parker in this 1930s Dust Bowl-set tale which follows a seventeen-year-old boy on his quest to capture a fugitive bank robber and collect the bounty on her head in order to save his family farm from foreclosure. He beats out the FBI and the local police to find her, only to discover that she’s far deadlier than the authorities expected. “Animal Kingdom” star Finn Cole plays the boy in the film which is helmed by 24-year-old wunderkind Miles Joris-Peyrafitte working from a Black List script by Nicolas Zwart. Garrett Hedlund also stars.

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“Dumbo”
Tim Burton started the whole Disney live-action adaptation of their animated classics wave with 2010’s “Alice in Wonderland,” and his more mellowed out Gothic weirdness in his old age has become catnip to the Mouse House where they’re happy to get him back. Here they take one of the well-known and lesser old school animated films, 1941’s “Dumbo,” and offer a loosely inspired adaptation which could well improve on the original. Will Smith was originally attached at one point but left, ultimately ending up in Disney’s “Aladdin” film opening two months later. Colin Farrell took on that role while Burton stalwarts like Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito and Eva Green reunite with the director for this early Spring release which aims to tug the heartstrings.

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“The Earthquake Bird”
A new Netflix mystery film from “Colette” and “Still Alice” director Wash Westmoreland sees her adapting Susanna Jones’ multiple award-winning 2001 debut novel which is set in Tokyo in 1989. Lucy Fly (Alicia Vikander), a young female expat, is suspected of murder when her friend (Riley Keough) goes missing in the wake of a tumultuous love affair with a handsome local photographer (Naoki Kobayashi). Jack Huston co-stars in the film which Ridley Scott is producing.

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“Echo Boomers”
The title is another name for millennials, and Seth Savoy’s feature directing debut stars Michael Shannon, Britt Robertson, Nick Robinson and Alex Pettyfer in the story of five post grads who figure the best way to get back at an unfair economy is to steal from the rich and give to themselves. Probably a festival first run in the Fall.

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“The Education of Fredrick Fitzell”
Dylan O’Brien, Maika Monroe, Hannah Gross, Emory Cohen, and Keir Gilchrist lead the cast of Christopher MacBride’s second film which is about a late 20s something going through an existential crisis. A chance encounter with a man from his youth sees him unravel a long-hidden mystery about a missing girl, a drug called Mercury, and a terrifying creature that has now followed him into adulthood.

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“Eli”
Much like what happened with “The Cloverfield Paradox,” Paramount has offloaded this horror film to Netflix – not a promising start though it has a script that did make 2015’s Black List. Ciaran Foy (“Sinister 2”) helms the story of a boy receiving treatment for his auto-immune disorder who discovers that the institute he’s living isn’t as safe as he thought. Lili Taylor, Max Martini, Kelly Reilly and Sadie Sink co-star in the film which hits the streamer in March.

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“Ema”
With filming on his long-gestating “The True American” stalled , Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larrian (“Jackie,” “Neruda”) quickly assembled this secret project and filmed it in the Summer around the seaport of Valparaíso, hooking in hunks Gael García Bernal (“Y Tu Mama Tambien”) and Santiago Cabrera (“Salvation”) to lead. The story follows a dance choreographer (Bernal) and his schoolteacher wife (Mariana Di Girolamo) whose relationship collapses in the aftermath of an adoption that goes awry. Larrain calls the film a melodrama and it reportedly features several characters expressing themselves through contemporary dance, including reggaeton, but the film is NOT a musical. He also shot it in a way the actors didn’t fully know what they were filming until it was complete.

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“Escape Room”
“Insidious: The Last Key” director Adam Robitel takes on this cheap teen-targeted psycho-thriller in which six strangers are invited to compete in a series of immersive escape rooms. When they discover that the rooms contain deadly traps, they must use their wits to survive. Essentially it’s “Saw” with less emphasis on torture porn and Sony released it this past Friday when horror plays well – the tactic worked with the film earning 140% of its budget in one weekend. Logan Miller, Deborah Ann Woll, Taylor Russell and Tyler Labine star.

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“Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile”
Filmmaker Joe Berlinger has made his name on numerous acclaimed documentaries from “Metallica: Some Kind of Monster” to “Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory”. Now, for his first narrative feature in many years, he tackles the case of infamous U.S. serial killer Ted Bundy (played by Zac Efron) but through the perspective of his longtime girlfriend Elizabeth Kloepfer (played by Lily Collins) who went years denying the accusations against Bundy but ultimately turned him in to the police. She only found out the truth with everyone else when Bundy began talking about his extensive and heinous murders. The film is one of the most high profile to screen at Sundance this year.

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“Eve”
Jessica Chastain gets her own assassin movie with this piece which is said to be much more of a character drama akin to “The American” than an action feature like “Atomic Blonde”. Chastain both stars in and produces the film which went through controversy last year when writer/director Matthew Newton had to exit as the director as multiple allegations of assault and domestic violence from his past came back up and Chastain, a vocal advocate of the MeToo movement, was accused of hypocrisy. Newton’s script is still being used, but Chastain’s “The Help” director Tate Taylor came onboard to replace him in the director’s chair. Subsequently, an impressive supporting cast including Colin Farrell, Common, John Malkovich, Geena Davis and Joan Chen signed on.

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“Farmageddon: A Shaun the Sheep Movie”
Aardman Animations’ sequel to the 2015 film adaptation of the hit kids TV series, the first film was considered one of the best animated films (and overall films) of its year, so anticipation is understandably high. In the new one, an adorable alien with amazing powers crash lands near Mossy Bottom farm. Shaun sees this as an opportunity for adventure, setting off on a mission to send the intergalactic visitor home before a sinister organisation can capture her and an alien invasion begins. Much of the same team from the first film returns for the new one.

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“Fighting with My Family”
British comedian Stephen Merchant has teamed with Dwayne Johnson and WWE Studios on this comedy-drama which offers a narrative take on the 2012 documentary of the same name about wrestler Paige (Florence Pugh). She and her brother Zak Zodiac (Dunkirk’s Jack Lowden) are siblings who make a living as wrestlers performing in tiny venues alongside their reformed gangster parents (Nick Frost & Lena Headey). Things change when she is accepted into the WWE.

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“First Cow”
Acclaimed American indie director Kelly Reichardt follows up “Certain Women” with a new film which adapts half of the novel “The Half Life” by Jon Raymond. It’s familiar territory as Raymond penned the scripts for HBO’s “Mildred Pierce” mini-series and many of Reichardt’s other films including “Night Moves,” “Old Joy,” “Wendy and Lucy” and “Meek’s Cutoff”. The casting is decidedly less high profile here, former “Star Trek: DS9” and “Boston Legal” regular Rene Auberjonois the biggest name in the cast in the story of a cook and a refugee in Oregon Territory in the 1820s who set off on a wild journey taking them across the West, all the way to China, and back again.

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“Flarsky”
Filmmaker Jonathan Levine and his “50/50” star Seth Rogen team for this much more upbeat comedy about an unemployed journalist who suffers from misfortune and self-destructive ways. He attempts to pursue his childhood babysitter and crush (Charlize Theron), a woman who is now running for U.S. President and is one of the most powerful and unattainable on Earth. While the premise sounds both potentially ridiculous and awkward, the film was test screened to such overwhelmingly positive reaction that Lionsgate delayed it so it could be released in June and are marketing it like a summer tentpole – that’s confidence. Supporting cast is also great including O’Shea Jackson Jr., Bob Odenkirk, Randall Park as Rogen’s editor, Andy Serkis as a media mogul, and Alexander Skarsgard as the Prime Minister of Canada no less.

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“Fonzo”
Filmmaker Josh Trank broke through with the great “Chronicle” and then crashed and burned with the disastrous production and release of the “Fantastic Four” reboot and his subsequent walking away from a plum “Star Wars” spin-off gig. Now he finally returns with this New Orleans-shot indie biopic of ruthless Chicago businessman, bootlegger and gangster Al Capone, one strong enough to attract Tom Hardy to the role. The story deals with Capone, now in his late forties and following nearly a decade of imprisonment, who has to deal with dementia rotting his mind. Harrowing memories of his violent and brutal origins soon creep into his everyday life. Linda Cardellini, Jack Lowden, Matt Dillon and Kyle MacLachlan also star in the story which should be surreal and could get quite dark. It also boasts a soundtrack by El-P from Run The Jewels.

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“Ford v. Ferrari”
“Logan” director James Mangold helms this $100 million biographical drama feature about Henry Ford’s desire to beat perennially dominant Ferrari at their own game of Grand Prix at the 1966 Le Mans race in France. Matt Damon plays automotive visionary Carroll Shelby and Christian Bale plays driver Ken Miles who were tasked by Henry Ford II (Tracy Letts) and exec Lee Iacocca (Jon Bernthal) to build from scratch an entirely new automobile to win the race – resulting in the creation of the Ford GT40 which would do so consecutively for four years. The project has been in the works for a while, at one point it was looking to be a Cruise/Pitt vehicle, before ultimately going before the cameras this past Summer.

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“Frankie”
Ira Sachs (“Love is Strange,” “Keep the Lights On,” “Little Men”) tackles an ensemble holiday drama in which three generations of a family go through a life-changing experience during one day on vacation in Sintra, Portugal, a historic town known for its dense gardens and fairy-tale villas and palaces. Celebrated actress Isabelle Huppert teams with Sachs in the film which also stars Greg Kinnear, Marisa Tomei, Brendan Gleeson and Jeremie Renier. Sachs calls this a “delicate story of a family in crisis” which is both nuanced and risk taking but could be seen as overly theatrical to some. As this is Sachs’ first time working outside of the United States, it should prove an interesting fest circuit release.

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“Frozen 2”
Disney animation has had many hits in recent years, but none have been the pure cultural juggernaut that was “Frozen”. The 2013 CG animated musical fantasy and loose adaptation of “The Snow Queen” raked in just under $1.3 billion worldwide, making it still the highest-grossing animated film of all time, and won two Oscars in the process. A sequel was inevitable and so we have this follow-up which has taken a long time to gestate and those involved claim they didn’t want to proceed unless they could come up with something that would live up to the quality of the first. Much of the same cast and crew are back, joined by “Hidden Figures” scribe Allison Schroeder to help co-write, and this is expected to be a box-office juggernaut over the Thanksgiving holiday.

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ALSO COMING IN 2019
“Code 8,” “Dragon Rider,” “Duck Duck Goose,” “Eternal Beauty,” “Fisherman’s Friends,” “Five Feet Apart”.

NOTABLE FILMS OF 2019 GUIDE

Volume 0-B
“3 from Hell,” “6 Underground,” “17 Bridges,” “47 Meters Down: Uncaged,” “1917,” “Ad Astra,” “The Addams Family,” “The Aeronauts,” “After,” “The Aftermath,” “After the Wedding,” “Against All Enemies,” “Aladdin,” “Alita: Battle Angel,” “All-Star Weekend,” “All the Bright Places,” “Always Be My Maybe,” “Amundsen,” “Angel Has Fallen,” “Angel of Mine,” “Anna,” “Annabelle 3,” “Antlers,” “Arctic,” “Are You Afraid of the Dark?,” “Artemis Fowl,” “The Art of Racing in the Rain,” “Ash Is Purest White,” “Avengers: Endgame,” “Bad Education,” “Bad Hair,” “The Banker,” “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” “The Beach Bum,” “Benedetta,” “Bergman Island,” “The Best of Enemies,” “Blackbird,” “Boss Level,” “The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind,” “BrightBurn,” “Burden”.

Volume C-F
“Call of the Wild,” “Captain Marvel,” “Captive State,” “Cats,” “Chaos Walking,” “Charlie’s Angels,” “Child’s Play,” “City of Lies,” “Cold Pursuit,” “The Cradle,” “The Curse of La Llorona,” “Danger Close,” “Dark Phoenix,” “The Dead Don’t Die,” “The Death & Life of John F. Donovan,” “The Devil All The Time,” “Dhaka,” “The Diary,” “The Dirt,” “Dolemite is My Name,” “Dolor Y Gloria,” “Domino,” “Doom,” “Dora the Explorer,” “Downhill,” “Downton Abbey,” “Dreamland,” “Dumbo,” “The Earthquake Bird,” “Echo Boomers,” “The Education of Fredrick Fitzell,” “Eli,” “Ema,” “Escape Room,” “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,” “Eve,” “Farmageddon: A Shaun the Sheep Movie,” “Fighting with My Family,” “First Cow,” “Flarsky,” “Fonzo,” “Ford v. Ferrari,” “Frankie,” “Frozen 2”.

Volume G-J
“Gemini Man,” “Georgetown,” “Glass,” “Gloria Bell,” “The Glorias: A Life On The Road,” “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” “Going Places,” “The Goldfinch,” “The Good Liar,” “Greyhound,” “Grudge,” “Happy Death Day 2U,” “Harriet,” “Hellboy,” “High Flying Bird,” “High Life,” “The Highwaymen,” “Hobbs and Shaw: Fast & Furious Presents,” “The Hole in the Ground,” “Honey Boy,” “Hotel Mumbai,” “How to Build a Girl,” “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World,” “The Hummingbird Project,” “The Hunt,” “The Hustle,” “I Am Mother,” “In Fabric,” “In the Shadow of the Moon,” “In the Tall Grass,” “The Informer,” “The Irishman,” “Ironbark,” “Isn’t It Romantic,” “IT: Chapter Two,” “Jacob’s Ladder,” “John Wick 3: Parabellum,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “Joker,” “Jonssonligan,” “J.T. LeRoy,” “Judy and Punch,” “Jumanji 3,” “Jungleland”.

Volume K-N
“The Kid,” “The Kid Who Would Be King,” “The Kindness of Strangers,” “The King,” “Kingsman: The Great Game,” “The Kitchen,” “Knives Out,” “Kursk,” “Lady & The Tramp,” “Last Christmas,” “The Last Full Measure,” “The Last Thing He Wanted,” “Late Night,” “The Laundromat,” “The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part,” “Light of My Life,” “The Lighthouse,” “Limited Partners,” “The Lion King,” “Little,” “Little Joe,” “Little Monsters,” “Little Women,” “The Lodge,” “The Long Home,” “Lost Girls,” “Lost Transmissions,” “Mainstream,” “The Many Saints of Newark,” “Mary,” “Matthias & Maxime,” “Medieval,” “Men in Black International,” “Midsommar,” “Midway,” “Miss Bala,” “Missing Link,” “Monday,” “Motherless Brooklyn,” “Murder Mystery,” “My Zoe,” “Native Son,” “The Nest,” “The New Mutants,” “The Nightingale,” “Nomis,” “Non-Fiction”.

Volume O-S
“Official Secrets,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” “Once Upon a Time in Staten Island,” “Out of Blue,” “The Outpost,” “Pain and Glory,” “Pale Blue Dot,” “Paradise Hills,” “Parasite,” “The Parts You Lose,” “The Peanut Butter Falcon,” “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” “Pet Sematary,” “Peterloo,” “Pokemon: Detective Pikachu,” “Polar,” “Portrait of a Girl on Fire,” “The Prodigy,” “The Professor and the Madman,” “Project X-traction,” “Proxima,” “Queen & Slim,” “Rabid,” “Radegund,” “Rambo: Last Blood,” “Red Joan,” “The Red Sea Diving Resort,” “The Report,” “Resistance,” “The Rhythm Section,” “Richard Says Goodbye,” “Roads,” “Rocketman,” “Rolling Thunder Revue,” “Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark,” “Serenity,” “Shazam!,” “Someone Great,” “Son of Shaft,” “Sonic the Hedgehog,” “Sound of Metal,” “The Souvenir,” “Spider-Man: Far From Home,” “Star Wars: Episode IX,” “Stargirl,” “Storm Boy,” “Stuber,” “The Sunlit Night,” “Superintelligence,” “Sweetness in the Belly,” “Synchronic”.