The Notable Films Of 2020: G-K

The Notable Films Of 2020 G K

This third of six volumes of a look at 2020’s big films includes a “Ghostbusters” sequel that’s not tied to its recent reboot, Disney attempting another go at a live-action adaptation of a ride, biopics about a sporting dad and a boxer suffering under the Nazi, and an adaptation of a celebrated musical.

There’s also a great big monster mash, a return to form for an iconic UK director, a darker and more domestic take on one of the great horror novels, a sequel to a revival that actually met strong praise, a reboot of a remake that no-one called for, and a whole lot of movies about ladies kicking ass.

The remaining three volumes should come much quicker with the aim of having all six out by the end of next week. As usual please leave your comments below if you’re enjoying these and give us an idea of what films you’re interested in seeing in 2020. Here’s this year’s biggest films beginning with G, H, I, J & K:

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“The Gentlemen”
Already released in select territories, this marks Guy Ritchie’s return to the British gangster genre he helped define and which he hasn’t really been back to since “Rocknrolla” a good decade ago. Matthew McConaughey leads the cast as American businessman Mickey Pearson who has created a highly profitable marijuana empire in London. When word gets out that he is looking to cash out his business, it triggers various plots, schemes, bribery and blackmail. While the main actors like McConaughey, Michelle Dockery and Henry Golding are fine, it’s the supporting turns from Hugh Grant as a sleazy journalist who narrates the story, Charlie Hunnam as Mickey’s methodical right hand man, and Colin Farrell as a local coach for troubled youth who steal the show. The film’s humor won’t be for all and it hits some questionable notes at times (especially in terms of racial humor), but some of Ritchie’s excesses are welcomely trimmed down this time.

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“The Georgetown Project”
“The Final Girls” scribes M.A. Fortin & Joshua John Miller pen and direct this Miramax horror thriller which doubles as a meta take on modern Hollywood. Russell Crowe stars as a troubled actor who begins to unravel while shooting a horror film and his estranged daughter wonders if he’s slipping back into his past addictions or if there’s something more sinister at play. The project hails in part from “Scream” creator Kevin Williamson who also produces, and boasts some solid supporting talent including Sam Worthington, Ryan Simpkins, David Hyde Pierce, Adam Goldberg, Jimmi Simpson, Tracey Bonner, Chloe Bailey and Samantha Mathis.

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“Ghostbusters: Afterlife”
In the wake of the misogynistic and racist vitriol that spilled out over Paul Feig’s decent if underwhelming female-led 2016 reboot of the “Ghostbusters” franchise, it can’t help but feel like this direct sequel to the original two films is an attempt to appease the online trolls. That wouldn’t be unheard of, ‘Rise of Skywalker’ is not unfairly being accused of the same thing, but this is also not a project than can be easily dismissed. Filmmaker Jason Reitman, who has hit a bit of a slump lately, returns to take the helm of the franchise his father once steered. In addition to bringing back many of the surviving members of the cast, the film promises to do something different – evoking a “Super 8” or “Stranger Things” style focus on a family who become caught up in supernatural events that ultimately tie back to the “Ghostbusters” elements being brought back into play. With Paul Rudd, Finn Wolfhard and Carrie Coon joining the mix, and a very solid first trailer released the other week, there may be hope here if the film can escape the rhetoric and baggage it has already been saddled with.

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“The Glorias”
Famed feminist writer and scholar Gloria Steinem gets a biopic treatment by playwright Sarah Ruhl with the plan to explore her life at various different stages. Lulu Wilson (“The Haunting of Hill House”) will play the young teenage version, Alicia Vikander is the young adult version, and Julianne Moore is the older version of Steinem in the film which marks the welcome return to the screen of visually spectacular filmmaker Julie Taymor (“Titus,” “Frida,” “Across the Universe”) after nearly a decade’s absence. Bette Midler, Janelle Monae, Timothy Hutton and Lorraine Toussaint also star while the film will have its world premiere at Sundance.

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“Godzilla vs Kong”
The fourth and apparently final film in the joined universe that began with Gareth Edwards’ noble if flawed “Godzilla,” Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ surprisingly stellar “Kong: Skull Island,” and Michael Dougherty’s somewhat overbloated “Godzilla: King Of The Monsters”. In the wake of that last film, excitement for this has calmed down – even with “You’re Next” and “The Guest” helmer Adam Wingard directing. This time out though, the film benefits from being pulled together from a writer’s room with some impressive talent involved in its creation. Legendary has smartly delayed the film, moving it back from March to November in order to get some breathing room before bringing the two titans together whilst also delving into both of their origins. Alexander Skarsgard, Rebecca Hall, Brian Tyree Henry, Lance Reddick, Jessica Henwick and Eiza Gonzalez co-star in the film while Millie Bobby Brown, Zhang Ziyi and Kyle Chandler reprise their roles.

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“Good Morning, Midnight”
In the wake of the critical and commercial failure of the dark farce “Suburbicon,” full props to George Clooney for continuing to be unafraid to take chances and try something different with each outing. Here he tackles a Netflix original film adaptation of the Lily Brooks-Dalton novel which is a survival tale set in the wake of a mysterious global catastrophe. Clooney stars as a scientist, alone in the Arctic, who is racing to contact and stop a spacecraft, its commander Sully (Felicity Jones) and her fellow astronauts from returning to Earth. Kyle Chandler, Demian Bechir, David Oyelowo co-star in the film which was adapted by “The Revenant” screenwriter Mark L. Smith and is described as ‘haunting’ by Clooney himself.

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“Green Knight”
David Lowery’s fifth outing following the divisive yet ambitious “Ghost Story” and the effortlessly enjoyable “The Old Man and the Gun”. This time out he’s doing a medieval fantasy re-telling of the 14th century Sir Gawain and the Green Knight story for A24. Dev Patel, Barry Keoghan, Alicia Vikander, Ralph Ineson, Sean Harris lead the cast of the cost-effective epic which was shot in Ireland in early 2019 and has WETA Digital working on the effects. The original tale follows King Arthur’s cousin Gawain who beheads the Green Knight easily. His opponent survives, however, and demands Sir Gawain uphold his half of the oath and return in one year to be beheaded. Gawain then leaves the court to spend the year traveling and enjoying his time left. Best bet is Lowery will play up the dark comedy aspects, but with such differing tones between his films we could be in for a real surprise.

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“Greyhound”
They don’t make classic Alistair MacLean war movies like “The Guns of Navarone” or “Where Eagles Dare” anymore, but we might get to see a modern take on that genre with this $50 million adaptation of “Horatio Hornblower” author C. S. Forester’s WW2 naval thriller novel “The Good Shepherd”. “Get Low” helmer Aaron Schneider returns after a decade to direct the film in which Tom Hanks plays Ernest Krause, a USN commander who must protect an international convoy of 37 Allied ships from wolf packs of German U-boats as they cross the North Atlantic. At the same time Krause, commanding the titular Navy destroyer leading the fleet, battles his own self-doubts and personal demons. Stephen Graham, Elisabeth Shue and Karl Glusman co-star in the film which Hanks himself adapted the script for. Originally slated for March, Sony has big hopes for this and have given it a prime Summer slot on May 8th.

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“The Grudge”
A U.S. reboot of the supernatural psychological horror franchise that began with the Japanese “Ju-On” films, became the hit “The Grudge” U.S. remake, spawned two further sequels, and is now being reimagined here in what is essentially a second remake with all new ghosts, characters and a new mythology. Once again Sam Raimi, Robert Tapert, and Takashige Ichise will produce but “The Eyes of My Mother” writer/director Nicolas Pesce is helming this time out from a script co-written with Jeff Buhler (“Midnight Meat Train”) and aims to bring a much darker, more sinister and grittier sensibility to the story along with a more stylish overall aesthetic. Andrea Riseborough, Demián Bichir, John Cho, Lin Shaye, Jacki Weaver, Betty Gilpin and William Sadler co-star in the film which marks the first official wide release of 2020, and reviews released late last week explain why – it’s a dog.

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“Gunpowder Milkshake”
One of several action thrillers this year focused on an all-star female cast kicking ass and taking names against the men who wronged them. Unlike “Birds of Prey,” this is a more straightforward affair but boasts an even more eclectic and wonderful cast. Karen Gillan (“Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Jumanji: The Next Level”) plays a young assassin who, along with her estranged assassin mother (Game of Thrones’ Lena Headey) team up and go on the run to take down a male-dominated crime syndicate they used to work for. If that pairing wasn’t enough, they’re joined by Angela Bassett, Michelle Yeoh and Carla Gugino. Their enemies? Paul Giamatti, “The Terror” breakout Adam Nagaitis and excellent character actors like Ralph Ineson and Ivan Kaye. Helmed by “Big Bad Wolves” director Navot Papushado and shot in Berlin last summer, the only concern here is if this focuses too much on style (ala “Shoot ‘Em Up”) in favor of delivering a solid story with the sheer raw talent they have here.

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“Good Joe Bell”
Originally slated to be a Cary Fukunaga vehicle, the filmmaker opted out and was instead replaced by Reinaldo Marcus Green (“Monsters and Men,” “Stone Cars”) who has both this and “King Richard” opening this year. “Brokeback Mountain” scribes Larry McMurty and Diana Ossana penned the script for the film which will star Mark Wahlberg as real-life Oregonian father Joe Bell, a man who sets out on a walk across the United States with his young son Jadin (Reid Miller). Fukunaga still produces the film along with Wahlberg and Jake Gyllenhaal, but distributor and producer A24’s exit from the project suggests that this, which really could’ve really been something different, has instead been reshaped into more of a crowd pleasing vehicle. Connie Britton, Maxwell Jenkins and Gary Sinise co-star in the film which was shot in Utah last year.

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“Halloween”
2018’s “Halloween” was an example of a revival done right, one that stayed true to the original film whilst deftly sidestepping all the baggage that came with the increasingly lackluster original sequels and Rob Zombie’s two pieces of utter garbage. In the wake of that success, a sequel was inevitable – especially with director David Gordon Green and co-writer Danny McBride indicating the original plan for the 2018 revival was two films shot back-to-back. Instead we’re getting two more films (so three in total) with this, the first of the two sequels, arriving ahead of “Halloween Ends” next year. The Michael Myers and Laurie Strode story continues here, and brings in some welcome new elements from Anthony Michael Hall taking over the Tommy Doyle role from the original to Kyle Richards and Nancy Stephens reprising their parts. If they can maintain the standard of the revival, or improve then we should be in for a treat.

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“Happiest Season”
Just as me and the other members of the gay male population swooned when hearing about the film in which Chris Hemsworth plays a male stripper, so to the L of the LGBT community had to catch their breath there when this wonderfully queer holiday romance feature was announced with pin-ups Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis starring as girlfriends for queer actor pioneer-turned-filmmaker Clea DuVall. Stewart and Davis have both more than proven their acting chops and here they play a couple about to take the next step until one of them realises the other hasn’t come out to their conservative parents. Full props to TriStar for giving full studio backing to content more normally relegated to indies, bring on the girl-on-girl emotional tenderness and smooching.

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“Harry Haft”
Ben Foster is continuing his recent streak of biopics with this Barry Levinson-directed historical drama involving boxers and guilt. Justine Juel Gillmer penned the Black List script based on the Alan Scott Haft novel which is set across the mid 20th century. Haft was a boxer who survived Auschwitz by being forced to fight fellow prisoners for sport – if he won he could eat and live. His 76 opponents however were led to their deaths in the camps, and after the war Haft is racked by guilt over the price of survival. As a result he tries to use high-profile fights against boxing legends like Rocky Marciano to rediscover a reason to live. Billy Magnussen, Danny DeVito, Vicky Krieps, Peter Sarsgaard and John Leguizamo co-star in the film which will almost certainly get a fest launch.

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“Hillbilly Elegy”
In his first film since “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” filmmaker Ron Howard returns with this adaptation of J.D. Vance’s memoir which has been described as a modern exploration of the American Dream and follows three generations of an Appalachian family, the perspective unfolding from that of a Yale law student forced to return to his hometown. This Georgia-shot project was one in high demand a year or so ago with a bidding war resulting in Netflix snagging the rights for a very costly $45 million. Amy Adams, Glenn Close, Gabriel Basso, Haley Bennett and Freida Pinto star in the film which was adapted by “The Shape of Water” scribe Vanessa Taylor and will potentially be an awards play for the streamer.

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“The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard”
No-one would include 2017’s “The Hitman’s Bodyguard” on a best films of the year list, reviews were mixed and even the stars seem quite comfortable with the fact it was a middling affair. The issue wasn’t so much the comedic pairing of Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson, which was praised, but rather the lackluster film around it. Grossing a solid $178 million though from a modest budget, thanks in part to some clever marketing, a sequel was inevitable. The good news is this is a more interesting looking follow-up with a stronger supporting cast including Frank Grillo, Antonio Banderas, Morgan Freeman, Tom Hopper alongside returnees like Salma Hayek and Richard E. Grant. Made by the same team and occupying the same late Summer release slot, expect it to probably do similar business to the first.

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“Honest Thief”
This year’s Liam Neeson-led action thriller vehicle following the far better than expected “Cold Pursuit” sees him as bank robber who tries to turn himself in because he’s falling in love and wants to live an honest life. However, when he realizes the Feds are more corrupt than him, he must fight back to clear his name. Mark Williams, who co-created Netflix’s “Ozark” series, helms this indie feature which boasts a far better than average supporting cast including Anthony Ramos (“In the Heights”) and Jai Courtney (“Suicide Squad”) as corrupt FBI agents, Kate Walsh as Neeson’s love interest, and the likes of veterans like Jeffrey Wright, Robert Patrick, Jeffrey Donovan and Jasmine Cephas Jones in other roles.

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“The Humans”
An inner city “Osage: August County”? That seems to be what’s on offer here in the film adaptation of Stephen Karam’s award winning play about a Thanksgiving family gathering at the run-down Manhattan apartment in Chinatown of Brigid Blake and her boyfriend Richard (Steven Yeun). The family includes Aimee, Brigid’s lesbian lawyer sister who just got dumped and has developed an intestinal ailment. There’s also Brigid’s parents, who are unhappy that their daughters have left home and have abandoned their religion, and their Alzheimer-riddled grandmother. Beanie Feldstein, Richard Jenkins, June Squibb and Amy Schumer co-star in the film which Karam adapted and directs himself with A24 set to release it late 2020 – looks like one of those vehicles that will try for some acting award honors in multiple categories.

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“The Hunt”
“Compliance” and “Z for Zachariah” director Craig Zobel re-teams with “The Leftovers” writers Damon Lindelof and Nick Cuse for this Blumhouse feature which would’ve already slipped by unnoticed last Summer if it weren’t for two little issues – real life mass shootings and a firestorm over the film’s perceived political leanings that even invoked a reaction from major U.S. politicians. Betty Gilpin, Ike Barinholtz, Hilary Swank, Emma Roberts, Ethan Suplee and Justin Hartley star in the story which follows twelve strangers with conservative leanings who mysteriously wake up in a forest clearing only to discover that they are being hunted for sport by a group of rich liberal elites. The film should get a release this year, the only question is when and how because lets face it – despite all the controversy and arguments over its merit, who doesn’t want to see Betty Gilpin kicking ass with a shotgun?

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“I’m Thinking of Ending Things”
One of the greatest and most eccentric writer/directors of the modern era, Charlie Kaufman, returns with this new adaptation of the Ian Reid novel about an unnamed woman who lets the boyfriend she wants to break up with take her to see his parents on a remote farm – things get increasingly disturbing from there and the term ‘unreliable narrator’ doesn’t begin to cover what happens. The book itself is also a careful balance of tone, veering from darkly satirical to disturbing psychothriller, but Kaufman is not one to approach any adaptation straight on so it’s anybody’s guess as to what to expect – especially with Netflix funding the bill and giving him free reign. Jesse Plemmons, Jessie Buckley, Toni Collette and David Thewlis co-star in the movie and have teased it was a crazy shoot so it’s time to get legitimately excited.

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“In The Heights”
Before he became a household name thanks to the success of “Hamilton,” Lin-Manuel Miranda broke out with the Best Musical Tony award-winning “In the Heights” which is now scoring a film adaptation. Helmed by “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Step Up 3D” director Jon M. Chu, the story follows a romantically challenged bodega owner named Usnavi (Anthony Ramos) who narrates the complex lives of his neighbors in the predominantly Hispanic area of Washington Heights, Manhattan. Leslie Grace, Jimmy Smits, Stephanie Beatriz, Dascha Polanco co-star in the film which features a diverse cast and plenty of rapping between the choruses, along with a cameo from Miranda himself. Of course the path from musical to film can be tricky, just look at “Cats,” but Warners is pumping this out mid-Summer and seem pretty high on it.

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“Irresistible”
Jon Stewart’s retirement from “The Daily Show” saw him segue into directing, but his first directorial effort with the political drama “Rosewater” came and went with little fanfare, acclaim or box-office. Six years later he returns with his decidedly more comedic and populist leaning film in which Steve Carell plays a leading Democratic political strategist who sees the mayoral bid of a retired Marine Colonel (Chris Cooper) in a small right-wing Wisconsin town as the key to the left winning back the Heartland. Sensing the threat, the Republican send in a strategist rival named Faith (Rose Byrne) and a local race becomes a fight for the soul of America. Mackenzie Davis, Will Sasso, Debra Messing, Natasha Lyonne and Topher Grace co-star in the film which arrives in a whole different landscape than the one Stewart’s version of the Daily Show left behind and as “The Hunt” demonstrated, these are dangerous waters to tread.

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“Infinite”
After sticking mostly to contemporary or period tales, filmmaker Antoine Fuqua tries his hand at science fiction with this past-lives drama based on D. Eric Maikranz’s novel “The Reincarnationist Papers”. The story deals with the Cognomina, a secret society of people who possess total recall of their past lives. One troubled man (Mark Wahlberg), haunted by memories of two past lives, stumbles upon them and dares to join their ranks. John Lee Hancock and Ian Shorr co-wrote the film which could easily be dismissed if it weren’t for a solid supporting cast in tow including Dylan O’Brien, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Sophie Cookson, Tom Hughes, Rupert Friend and Jason Mantzoukas. Set for a late August release, fingers crossed it’s better than some of the other recent odious Wahlberg vehicles.

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“The Invisible Man”
Horror maestro Leigh Whannell, following in the wake of his wonderful lo-fi “Robocop” remix with 2018’s “Upgrade,” follows that with this new contemporary take on the H.G. Wells’ classic novel – taking the basic concept of the scientist who has turned himself invisible, and putting an almost 1990s psychological thriller spin on it. So far so “Hollow Man,” but Whannell takes the film out of the lab and adds a whole “Sleeping with the Enemy” element by shifting the central perspective to Elisabeth Moss’ character. We follow this innocent woman who is being stalked by the title character – a man (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) who is also her abusive ex-husband who seemingly committed suicide some time before. Aldis Hodge and Storm Reid co-star in the Blumhouse production which Whannell shot in Sydney for a relatively modest budget – resulting in a smaller scale but more character-based horror film than the abandoned and more action-centric Dark Universe tentpole version of this story would’ve been. Whannell has some serious talent and this should prove both entertaining and provocative.

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“Ironbark”
“On Chesil Beach” director Dominic Cooke follows up that period drama with another, this one with more espionage leanings. Benedict Cumberbatch plays a British businessman who helped the CIA penetrate the Soviet nuclear program during the Cold War and provided crucial intelligence that ended the Cuban Missile Crisis. “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” star Rachel Brosnahan co-stars in the feature which will have its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January. This is one of several Cumberbatch-led period dramas hitting this year, should be interesting to see if any of them break out.

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“The Jesus Rolls”
John Turturro reprises his iconic “The Big Lebowski” role of bowling enthusiast and Latin American North Hollywood resident Jesus Quintana. The thick Puerto Rican accent and the referring to himself in the third person character traits return for the project which the Coen Brothers gave Turturro their blessing to use the character they created. The new film serves as a remake of Bertrand Blier’s 1974 French film “Going Places” and follows a trio of sexually depraved misfits, including Quintana along with characters played by Bobby Cannavale and Audrey Tautou. The irreverent and highly charged dynamic reportedly evolves into a surprising love story as they inadvertently perform good deeds. They’re also pursued by both the law and a gun-toting hairdresser. Shot over three years ago, the film opened in Italy in October and reviews were not very kind.

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“Jesus Is My Homeboy”
Shaka King helms this biopic about American grass-roots activist, socialist and iconic member of the Black Panther Party – Fred Hampton. “Get Out” breakouts Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield reunite for the film which will likely change its name again before release. Kaluuya plays Hampton and Stanfield is up for William O’Neal, the man who betrayed Hampton to the FBI with the movie set to explore how the law enforcement agency infiltrated the Black Panthers, the psychology of their informant and the notorious death of a then 21-year-old Hampton during a controversial raid in which his and other deaths led to civil lawsuit settlements. Jesse Plemons, Dominique Fishback, Ashton Sanders, and Algee Smith co-star in the film which Warners will release later this year.

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“Jiu Jitsu”
Nicolas Cage and several fighters vs. an alien? That’s the basic setup of this sci-fi action feature that hails from writer-director Dimitri Logothetis who is responsible for one of the recent “Kickboxer” direct-to-video sequels. The star of those films, Alain Moussi, returns for this as a college wrestling coach and jiu-jitsu fighter who every six years must face off against an alien invader named Brax. Cage will play a character who teams up with him in a battle to defeat Brax, and is joined by Frank Grillo, Tony Jaa and Rick Yune in supporting roles. Should be fun trash.

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“Jolt”
It has been a while since the high-energy “Crank” films, but “Hysteria” filmmaker Tanya Wexler seems to be aiming to repeat that overall frantic action-comedy tone with this Kate Beckinsale vehicle. Here the “Underworld” star plays a kickass bouncer with a murderous anger-management problem. She uses an electrode-lined vest to shock herself back to normalcy whenever she gets homicidal, but when the first guy she’s ever fallen for is murdered and she’s framed for it – she goes on a revenge-fueled rampage to find the killer. It’s a fun cast alongside her including Jai Courtney as the love interest, Stanley Tucci in a supporting role and the intriguing pairing of Bobby Cannavale and Laverne Cox as the detectives hunting her down. Seems like a perfect later Summer or early Fall bit of escapist fun.

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“Jungle Cruise”
Desperate to repeat the success they had with “Pirates of the Caribbean,” another live-action film adaptation of a Disneyland ride makes its way to cinemas with this jungle adventure tale that blends the tone and basic formula of “The African Queen,” “Romancing the Stone” and “The Mummy”. Set during the early 20th century, Dwayne Johnson plays a riverboat captain who takes a scientist (Emily Blunt) and her brother (Jack Whitehall) on a mission into a jungle to find the Tree of Life which is believed to possess healing powers. All the while, the trio must fight against dangerous wild animals and a competing German expedition (led by Edgar Ramirez and Jesse Plemons). Shot primarily in Hawaii, rumor is British comedian Whitehall steals the show though there’s obviously some concern as well as his character was completely absent from the first trailer. Outside of ‘Pirates’, Disney hasn’t had much like with ride-to-film works so this could go either way.

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“Jungleland”
Frequent TV comedy director Max Winkler follows up his feature debut on 2017’s “Flower” with this Massachusetts-shot road trip drama starring the perfect casting of Jack O’Connell as a bare-knuckle boxer and Charlie Hunnam as his brother with the pair travelling across the country for one last fight. An unexpected travel companion (Jessica Barden) soon exposes the long-festering cracks in their bond along the way along with how their underclass upbringing has hardened them with time. Premiering in Toronto last year, the film scored good reviews but hasn’t set a release date as of yet.

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“Kajillionaire”
There’s excitement over “The Future” and “Me, You, and Everyone We Know” helmer Miranda July’s new film which promises to take big risks and defy conventional slotting into a genre with its story of a young woman who finds her life is turned upside down when her criminal parents invite an outsider to join them on a major robbery they’re planning. With Evan Rachel Wood as the woman and Richard Jenkins and Debra Winger, it’s fun casting in a potential major reinvention of the heist thriller/charming grifters genre. “The Hustle” and “Ocean’s 11” this definitely ain’t and thank god for that. Still, it’s a wait and see how this goes down at Sundance.

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“King of Staten Island”
Lanky SNL comedian Pete Davidson is mostly known for his very public romantic flings than his comedy bits, but it looks like he’s hoping to turn that around with the help of “Knocked Up” helmer Judd Apatow and this semi-autobiographical comedy-drama that aims to do for him what “Trainwreck” did for Amy Schumer. Davidson plays himself in this lightly fictional spin on his upbringing in Staten Island which included losing his father during 9/11 and the difficulty of breaking into stand-up comedy at a young age. Bel Powley, Steve Buscemi, Marisa Tomei, Maude Apatow, Bill Burr an Pamela Adlon co-star in the movie which comes with a surprising amount of baggage for a film about a guy largely unknown outside of the tabloids or the United States.

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“King Richard”
Serena and Venus Williams have dominated women’s tennis for much of this century, and a lot of that is in part to their father Richard wrote up a 78-page plan and started giving lessons to Venus and Serena when they were four and a half. He’s also been married multiple times, had a bunch of children, and more recently suffered strokes. How this film will portray his life and training of the girls is a big question as it could easily softball some obviously hard moments in his kid’s lifes. However the inclusion of both “Monsters and Men” director Reinaldo Marcus Green along with Will Smith in his first real drama since 2015’s underrated “Concussion” is a hopeful sign.

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“The King’s Man”
Serving as a prequel to the “Kingsman” espionage action comedy film franchise, director Matthew Vaughn returns to helm this outing set nearly a century earlier and boasting much more of a period drama tone even as it retains the big set piece spectacle. Stepping into the student-mentor roles in place of the Egerton/Firth dynamic this time are “Beach Rats” breakout Harris Dickinson and acting veteran Ralph Fiennes. The 1910s-set story will reportedly deal with the formation of the service as they try and stop a collection of history’s worst tyrants and criminal masterminds who are gathering together to plot a war to wipe out millions. Rhys Ifans co-stars as the manipulative Russian mystic villain Rasputin along with Daniel Bruhl, Charles Dance, Matthew Goode, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Tom Hollander, Gemma Arterton, Stanley Tucci and Djimon Hounsou in supporting roles.

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“ALSO COMING IN 2020”
Netflix’s Indian anthology horror film “Ghost Stories” with four short films made by filmmaking maestros from the sub-continent, a dsrk horror take on the Grimm fairy tale “Gretel and Hansel,” Eoin Macken’s adaptation of Rob Doyle’s novel “Here Are the Young Men” about Dublin teenagers who fall into shocking acts of transgression, and “The Breaker Upperers” duo Jacki Van Beek and Madeleine Sami helm “Hope” from a script by “Legally Blonde” scribes Kirsten Smith and Karen McCullah and starring Aubrey Plaza.

There’s also the high premised “Horizon Line” about a couple who must land a small plane in the tropics after their pilot suffers a heart attack, Jeff Baena’s “Horse Girl” starring Alison Brie as an shy woman whose lucid dreams start trickling into her life, Peter Facinelli’s “Hour of Lead” sees Thomas Jane and Anne Heche playing a couple trying to find their daughter who disappears on a family camping trip, and J. Blakeson’s “I Care A Lot” in which Rosamund Pike plays a legal guardian who discovers her seemingly perfect client is not who they appear to be.

Next comes the KJ Apa-led “I Still Believe” which is a biopic of Christian music star Jeremy Camp, Julia Hart’s “I’m Your Woman” in which a woman (Rachel Brosnahan) must go on the run with her child due to her husband’s crimes, and the long overdue release of “The Informer” in which Joel Kinnaman plays an ex-convict who goes back into prison in order to infiltrate the mob.

Finally there’s Anthony Jerjen’s “Inherit the Viper” about three opioid dealing siblings in Appalachia trying not to get caught up in violence, Tomas Alfredson’s “Jonssonligan” which reboots the famed Swedish saga, “Kill the Czar” in which a woman is blackmailed by an evil filmmaker (James Franco) to commit a heinous act, “The Killing of Two Lovers” in which a man must deal with separating from his wife, and Netflix’s rom-com sequel to their smash hit “The Kissing Booth”.

NOTABLE FILMS OF 2020 GUIDE

Volume 0-B
“A Quiet Place Part II,” “After Yang,” “All Day and A Night,” “Ammonite,” “An American Pickle,” “An Unquiet Life,” “Annette,” “Antebellum,” “Antlers,” “Army of the Dead,” “Artemis Fowl,” “Ava,” “Bad Boys for Life,” “Bad Hair,” “Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar,” “Benedetta,” “Bergman Island,” “Bill and Ted Face the Music,” “BIOS,” “Birds of Prey,” “The Birthday Cake,” “Black Bear,” “The Black Hand,” “Black Widow,” “Blithe Spirit,” “Blonde,” “Bloodshot,” “Bob’s Burgers: The Movie,” “Body Cam,” “Born to Be Murdered,” “Boss Level,” “Breaking News In Yuba County”

Volume C-F
“Call of the Wild,” “Candyman,” “The Card Counter,” “Chaos Walking,” “Cherry,” “Come Away,” “Coming to America,” “The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It,” “The Craft,” “Da 5 Bloods,” “Death on the Nile,” “Deep Water,” “The Devil All the Time,” “Dhaka,” “Dolittle,” “Don’t Worry Darling,” “Doorman,” “Downhill,” “Dreamland,” “Druk,” “Dune,” “The Education of Fredrick Fitzell,” “Emma,” “Enola Holmes,” “Enter the Fat Dragon,” “Eternals,” “Everybody’s Talking About Jamie,” “The Eyes of Tammy Faye,” “Fast And Furious 9,” “The Father,” “Fatherhood,” “Fear Street,” “Falling,” “False Positive,” “Fantasy Island,” “First Cow,” “Fonzo,” “The Forgiven,” “Free Guy,” “The French Dispatch,” “The Furnace”

Volume G-K
“The Gentlemen,” “The Georgetown Project,” “Ghostbusters: Afterlife,” “The Glorias,” “Godzilla vs Kong,” “Good Morning, Midnight,” “Green Knight,” “Greyhound,” “The Grudge,” “Gunpowder Milkshake,” “Good Joe Bell,” “Halloween,” “Happiest Season,” “Harry Haft,” “Hillbilly Elegy,” “The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” “Honest Thief,” “The Humans,” “The Hunt,” “I’m Thinking of Ending Things,” “In The Heights,” “Irresistible,” “Infinite,” “The Invisible Man,” “Ironbark,” “The Jesus Rolls,” “Jesus Is My Homeboy,” “Jiu Jitsu,” “Jolt,” “Jungle Cruise,” “Jungleland,” “Kajillionaire,” “King of Staten Island,” “King Richard,” “The King’s Man”