Reviews

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

By Josh Hylton July 11th 2014, PG-13, 130min, 20th Century Fox
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Say what you want about their production values, particularly the cheesy, rubbery make-up the actors were forced to wear in the older films, but the "Planet of the Apes" series, at least thematically, is one of the best and most intelligent science fiction series ever created.

Though not all were created equal, each movie had something fascinating to explore, but the first stands above the rest. With battling themes of science vs. religion and a controversial stance that intellectual progression was being impeded by archaic religious thought (which remains controversial even to this day), "Planet of the Apes" cemented itself as a riveting, thought provoking science fiction film. The following films dealt with bigotry, slavery, war and more, which kept them interesting even as their overall quality declined.

The 2011 series comeback, "Rise of the Planet of the Apes," attempted to explore similar ground, but lacked its predecessors' profundity. The newest entry, "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes," similarly fails to make much of a thematic impression, but it's a damn fine movie nonetheless, a summer spectacle full of mind-blowing action, wonderfully developed characters and a surprisingly emotional story you won't soon forget. Even with its thematic deficiencies, "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" can stand proud as the best film in the franchise since the 1968 original.

Ten years have passed since the last film and two since the last humans have been seen. The leader of the evolving apes, Caesar (Andy Serkis), has built a sanctuary for his fellow apes, a place they can all call home in the peaceful mountains outside San Francisco. However, just when they think humans might be gone for good, they stumble upon some on a mountain path. In their panic, the humans shoot one of the apes' sons, creating tension between the two factions.

Back in quarantined San Francisco, Malcolm (Jason Clarke) tells their own leader, Dreyfus (Gary Oldman), what they saw: talking apes in mass numbers. Dreyfus brushes this off as panicked hysteria, but soon finds his words to be true when the apes appear in front of them, demanding segregation. They'll fight if they have to, but they would prefer peace, achieved by keeping the humans in the city and the apes in the mountains. This arrangement isn't ideal for the humans, however, because they are running out of power and need to fix the dam in the mountains. Despite some skepticism, Caesar agrees to let them fix it, but each side is uncomfortable with the other and their paranoia leads them down a path neither want to see.

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" does a remarkable thing. Whereas most movies create two clear factions, one good and one bad, this one balances both masterfully, to the point where there is no distinct good or bad side. Each of those sides has good and bad characters, those that try to prevent war and others that try to perpetuate it, but it's not always a case of this side being right and that side being wrong. All are simply trying to survive in a new and mysterious world, so you come to care about both humans and apes, wishing hard for a peaceful outcome, but knowing the outcome is predetermined.

At its core, this is a film about family, in both the literal sense and in the camaraderie the two species have with their own kind. Each are willing to do whatever it takes to keep their families safe, neither wanting to go to war, but both willing to if they must. What "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" lacks in thematic depth, it more than makes up for with these wonderfully well written characters - the best written in the entire series - which leads way to an incredibly moving story that proceeds the way it does not simply because the screenplay calls for it, but because the characters onscreen have developed realistic motivations based on the experiences that come before.

This gives the action that follows more meaning than your typical summer fare. Only briefly does the story take a backseat to that action before it catches back up and gives it some narrative context. The death and destruction that erupts is heartbreaking due to the film's delicate handling of its characters, which continues through these breathtaking action sequences, including a steady cam single take on top of a tank that is enough to impress even non-film enthusiasts who don't usually notice those types of visual touches.

If you're a fan of the original films and are looking for some meaning in "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes," you'll find some, but it's nothing as interesting as the franchise's previous thematic endeavors. You'll get those themes of segregation, submission, control through fear and more, but we've seen these ideas before in other, more thematically focused films. Instead, this movie focuses on its finely tuned, character driven story, and there's nothing wrong with that. Even if you go in looking for something that ultimately isn't there, you'll leave happy after seeing what is.

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