Reviews

22 Jump Street

By Josh Hylton June 13th 2014, R, 112min, Sony Pictures
22 Jump Street

If someone asked me what the most surprisingly good movie in recent memory has been, I would confidently answer, "21 Jump Street." The film took a largely forgotten show from the late 80s/early 90s and abandoned much of its dramatic personality, replacing it instead with flavorful comedy and clever spoofs of the buddy cop action movie genre. Even the two lead stars seemed incompatible, but it proved to be a "don't judge a book by its cover" type of movie, firmly planting itself as one of the funniest and smartest comedies of that year.

Its sequel, wittily titled "22 Jump Street," isn't quite as successful, as its monotonous story gives it a mild case of "The Hangover Part II" syndrome, but the difference between that film and this one is that, while it reused similar situations from its predecessor, the jokes are fresh and more often than not manage to produce some big laughs.

"22 Jump Street" begins with a routine action scene-one involving an octopus of all things-a poor start to a sequel whose first movie nobody remembers for its action. Shortly after, it sets up its story through a quick meeting with Deputy Chief Hardy (Nick Offerman) where he explains to Schmidt (Jonah Hill) and Jenko (Channing Tatum) through some obvious, but still funny meta-humor that nobody expected them to succeed.

To bring the old Jump Street program back was a risk, but they were successful enough to keep the program running and this time with a bigger budget. He explains that their next assignment is exactly like their last, an obvious jab at the played out "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" Hollywood sequel mentality, only this time they're going to college. There's a new drug called Whyphy (pronounced Wi-Fi) making the rounds and, just like last time, their job is to find the dealer and stop the drug from being distributed nationwide.

Of course, just because a movie is aware that it's copying itself doesn't generate an automatic forgiveness for its narrative laziness. Despite a twist or two, there is nothing new here to keep one interested as it succumbs to the very same "rehashed sequel" issues that it repeatedly makes fun of through its nearly two hour runtime.

Even its drama is rehashed, only this time it's Schmidt that's jealous of Jenko's newfound popularity rather than vice versa. The only clear difference between this movie and the first one is that the lousy, ineffective drama is actually increased, needlessly pervading the entire thing and causing the film to fail even harder because of it. And yes, there's another drug trip scene.

"22 Jump Street" is one of the most self-deprecating movies I've ever seen, since it jokes about redundant sequels even as it relies entirely on those redundancies to form its story. Luckily, some genuine effort was made to be funny and the chemistry between Hill and Tatum is as strong as ever, which makes up for most of the film's shortcomings.

There are some terrific bits here, including the most awkward fistfight ever put to screen, and also like its predecessor, it cleverly skewers filmic clich├ęs, like the traditional "meet cute" scene. It's safe to say that if you laughed in the first movie, you're likely to laugh here as well, as Hill and Tatum play off each other about as well as any comedic duo has onscreen.

Also notable is the very welcome and surprisingly serious (albeit short-lived) plea for tolerance of homosexuals, though you'd have to be reaching pretty far to argue "22 Jump Street" is a message movie. Its intention is to simply make its audience laugh and sometimes that's all you need.

Despite its copy and paste story, unwanted increase in drama and one egregious moment of product placement involving Doritos as Jenko walks down a dorm building hallway, logo to camera, without actually eating them, the film works. Although it's unlikely to leave as much of an impression as the first movie, it's just plain funny. It does exactly what it promises it will do, which will be enough for most viewers who want more of the same, but let's just hope a third outing spices things up a bit.

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