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Raimi On Aborted "Warcraft," "Spider-Man 4"

By Garth Franklin Wednesday March 6th 2013 07:08AM
Raimi On Aborted "Warcraft," "Spider-Man 4"

Sam Raimi is continuing his "Oz: The Great and Powerful" publicity duties and, while speaking with Vulture, has touched upon the fate of two other high-profile projects that he is no longer involved in.

The first is the "World of Warcraft" movie which Raimi was attached to for several years before dropping out (Duncan Jones is currently slated to helm the film). Raimi went into surprising detail regarding his falling out over that project:

"Robert Rodat was working on the script, and it was taking a long time. I think they were getting a little antsy at Legendary Pictures, the production company. Actually, what happened was even more complicated, so let me go back a little bit.

First, they asked me if I wanted to make it, and I said, 'Yes, I love World of Warcraft, and I think it would make a great picture.' So I read a screenplay they had that was written by the guys at [Warcraft developer] Blizzard Entertainment, and it didn't quite work for me.

I told them I wanted to make my own original story with Robert, so we pitched it to Legendary and they accepted it, and then we pitched it to Blizzard, and they had reservations, but they accepted it.

Then Robert wrote the screenplay, and only once he was done did we realize that Blizzard had veto power, and we didn't know that. They had never quite approved the original story we pitched them. Those reservations were their way of saying, 'We don't approve this story, and we want to go a different way,' so after we had spent nine months working on this thing, we basically had to start over.

And Robert did start over, but it was taking too long for the people at Blizzard, and their patience ran out. Honestly, I think it was mismanagement on their behalf, not to explain to us that the first story was vetoed long ago. Why did they let us keep working on it? Were they afraid to tell me?

While that was not a pleasant experience for the filmmaker, the collapse of the fourth "Spider-Man" several years ago sounds like it was far less of a problem:

It really was the most amicable and undramatic of breakups: It was simply that we had a deadline and I couldn't get the story to work on a level that I wanted it to work. I was very unhappy with Spider-Man 3, and I wanted to make Spider-Man 4 to end on a very high note, the best Spider-Man of them all.

But I couldn't get the script together in time, due to my own failings, and I said to Sony, "I don't want to make a movie that is less than great, so I think we shouldn't make this picture. Go ahead with your reboot, which you've been planning anyway."

[Sony co-chairman] Amy Pascal said, "Thank you. Thank you for not wasting the studio's money, and I appreciate your candor." So we left on the best of terms, both of us trying to do the best thing for fans, the good name of Spider-Man, and Sony Studios.

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