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Exclusive Interview: Jon Foster for "Stay Alive"

By Paul Fischer Monday March 20th 2006 11:22PM
Jon Foster  for "Stay Alive"

Jon Foster has practiced his craft for many years. He started off in a local Iowa theatre and eventually furthered his career in Los Angeles with roles on television and on the big screen. He has very diverse interests and talents that include, playing drums, playing lead and bass guitar, and fixing up old muscle cars. He also enjoys snow boarding, rollerblading, and boxing. Foster is currently starring in the new horror flick Stay Alive and talked exclusively to Paul Fischer.

Question: Let me first of all ask you. What is the attraction that actors have these days to doing these kinds of genre movies?

Foster: I found that after when we started shooting it was kind of hard to not realize that on location shooting a horror film and you're running around, you're screaming, you're covered in blood and you're hanging out with people, the camaraderie that you have is amazing. It is like being at a camp, playing kids again, and just the best fun you could possibly have.

Question: How do you get into playing a character who is in constant jeopardy? The director was telling me that he tried to make this particular script a little bit more realistic so that audiences can relate. Did you find that as you were getting into this?

Foster: Absolutely, I mean even when I met them for the project I was I was going to very picky on what horror film I was going to do and I didn't want to a typical teen horror slasher movie, and neither did these guys. Rather they wanted to make something like you said that you could really relate to and that's everything is really underplayed and very realistic, but still has that horror feel to it. So there was definitely a reason why I was attached to it and why I really wanted to do it.

Question: What do you depend on in terms of your acting skills to play characters like this in a movie like this? I mean do you just rely totally on imagination or is there more to it than that?

Foster: I'd say with this, silence was definitely the key to it. I find that a lot of times horror movies are just filled with a lot of noise, but I really shot to make sure everything was very real and very quiet, like I just shot for very quiet.

Question: The key to a successful horror film for audiences is a sense of surprise I guess, but when you are an actor and what is going on, how do you maintain a certain degree of freshness so that it seems as if you to are surprised by what is going on?

Foster: That's a good question. Well to be honest it was hard not to be in that state of mind cause we were in New Orleans which is such a haunted city as they say on its own and when you there and you're shooting in the French Quarter in old colonial homes that are falling part and truly haunted you don't have to go far it is kind of like they say action and you're there you know.

Question: What was it like working in New Orleans, what was the experience like of doing that?

Foster: It was amazing. It was the most incredible city I've ever been to, it has just got so much soul and so much spirit in it and it is just like the most beautiful city, everyday is like so much is falling apart down there before Katrina hit and the city decided to keep those broken down buildings erected as best as they could cause it showed the history of the city, which was a really cool aspect that I don't see anywhere else.

Question: You were there before Katrina, so how shocked were you by the aftermath of Katrina?

Foster: It was shocking and really it was hard cause I felt so connected and so disconnected at the same time when it happen. I mean watching the news an I'm seeing buildings and locations where we shot just completely destroyed. I mean I feel connected to that city, but I mean to try to keep it in line it is nothing from what the people actually living there felt...

Question: Have you seen the movie finished?

Question: Have you already seen the movie?

Foster: I've seen a rough cut of the movie I haven't seen the final version.

Question: What are your thoughts?

Foster: I think it is really, really fun man, I mean like of course it is very hard for me to watch my own work and I actually rarely do, but when I saw this it was just such a fun movie it is like I can't imagine anybody going and not getting excited about it just because...I mean even the game play in the movie is so outstanding you walk out of there and you're like they have to make a video game, they have to, they have to make a video game from this movie. The shots they have from this are just so exciting.

Question: Now John how surprised are you by your acting career at this point. I mean do you see yourself to be a still up an coming, are you less struggling than you were, is it easier to get into meetings now than it use to be?

Foster: Yeah, yeah significantly. I mean it has been a lot easier in the last 2 years I've been very fortunate in work so now Hollywood is treating me a little bit better than it did when I first got here, yeah but I thing that goes for most people that just put in the time and effort.

Question: Where were you brought up?

Foster: I was brought up in Iowa in small town called Fairfield with about 8000 people.

Question: Not many actors I guess come from your town.

Foster: Yeah, mid west breeds them.

Question: Do you....I mean where did the actor in you come from?

Foster: Where did the actors come from?

Question: What else is happening for you, and what is coming up for you now?

Foster: I'm doing a TV show which just wrapped a few days ago called Wind Fall and that is for NBC that will be coming out in June and it is about like 15 people that win the lottery and how the money affects their lives.

Question: Is it a mini series or is like a replacement...

Foster: [Inaudible] we've shot 13 episodes and I guess it will air in June and then we'll find out whether or not we are going to keep going.

Question: Is television something that interests you?

Foster: I enjoy television but I would much prefer to move my way into films.

Question: And how do you find the whole audition thing?

Foster: The audition process it is a battle, its definitely a battle and you're going to war everyday for a part that you want. So you've got to be strong and have a game face in it, I mean it is tough it is not an easy.

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